Library & Data

Use our Library & Data section to view and download all of our ChinaFAQs fact sheets, graphics, and links to sources for climate and energy data.

Friday, June 15, 2012 - 08:59

Key Points

  • China’s new emissions standards for power plants are comparable to standards in the developed world in important respects.
  • These standards are being phased in quickly. They apply to new plants starting Jan. 1, 2012, and existing plants have just 2½ years to meet the standards.
  • The standards include provisions for even greater stringency in highly polluted areas.
  • China has raised electricity rates to fund the $41 billion investment in new pollution abatement equipment as well as the operating costs needed to comply with the standards.
  • These measures also encourage greater energy efficiency and the use of renewables, as they raise the cost of coal-fired power.
Tuesday, May 1, 2012 - 10:09

This ChinaFAQs Issue Brief highlights opportunities in the global clean energy revolution, discusses the comparative strengths of each nation, and provides examples of proposals and policies that the U.S. can employ to seize these opportunities by encouraging clean energy development. The brief stresses that the U.S. should capitalize on its strengths and take a strategic approach to innovation and commercialization. (Click to download)

Tuesday, May 1, 2012 - 10:08

This ChinaFAQs Issue Brief profiles a selection of recent U.S.-China cooperative projects in clean energy, offering a flavor of the breadth and depth of Sino-American cooperation, as well as potential benefits and challenges.

Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 16:32

I first would like to thank the members of the Commission for the opportunity to testify to this important group. It is an honor and a privilege.

I have been asked to speak about China’s approach to securing its energy supplies and implications for the United States. I will discuss China’s approach, whether it is impacting global energy markets and the competitive prospects of American energy companies, how Beijing’s energy security drive is influencing maritime territorial and sea lane disputes in the seas around Asia, and some suggestions on U.S. policy towards the developments.

Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 16:24

“China’s Prospects for Shale Gas and Implications for the U.S.”

Good morning and thank you for the opportunity to contribute to the deliberations of this Commission. My name is Sarah Forbes, and I am a Senior Associate for the Climate and Energy Program at the World Resources Institute. I am also manager of the World Resources Institute’s Shale Gas Initiative. The World Resources Institute is a non-profit, non-partisan environmental think tank that goes beyond research to provide practical solutions to the world’s most urgent environmental and development challenges. We work in partnership with scientists, businesses, governments, and non-governmental organizations in more than seventy countries to provide information, tools, and analysis to provide for human well-being.

Friday, September 23, 2011 - 11:44

The Guidelines for Carbon Dioxide Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) in China, prepared under a cooperative project of the Tsinghua BP Center and the World Resources Institute, is released in Beijing today.

The Guidelines are the first detailed examination of CCUS regulations in China. It provides a complete set of recommendations for how to regulate CCUS in its technical, environmental and social dimensions.

Monday, July 25, 2011 - 13:50

Key Points

  • China’s mounting energy demand spurred by rapid economic growth prompted important energy-saving measures in its 11th Five Year Plan.
  • Researchers found that many projects conceived to improve energy intensity were on track to meet or surpass their goals, while others have lagged.
  • The study offers recommendations for strengthening future efforts.
Monday, April 11, 2011 - 10:05

Download Joanna Lewis’ presentation outlining China’s progress in developing and deploying a variety of renewable technology.

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 10:01

Download Mark Levine’s presentation for EESI that shows the results of LBNL’s China Energy End-Use Model that shows projections of primary energy use, carbon emissions, and more through 2050.

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 09:53

Chairman Bingaman, Senator Murkowski, and other members of the Committee, thank you very much for inviting me to testify before you today on the topic of global investment trends in clean energy technologies1, and the impact of domestic policies on that investment. I am Kelly Sims Gallagher, a professor of energy and environmental policy at The Fletcher School, at Tufts University. I direct our program on Energy, Climate, and Innovation, and concurrently serve as a Senior Research Associate at the Belfer Center in the Harvard Kennedy School. I served as a Visiting Professor at Tsinghua University’s School of Public Policy and Management last summer where I conducted research on global energy commercialization, with emphasis on the role of China.