Library & Data

Use our Library & Data section to view and download all of our ChinaFAQs fact sheets, graphics, and links to sources for climate and energy data.

Wednesday, June 2, 2010 - 11:35

Why is Industrial Energy So Important in China?

China’s energy use more than quadrupled from 1980 to 2007 (see Fig. 1), and continues to grow, due in part to the demands of urbanization (i.e. construction of new buildings and infrastructure), and in part to rising production of manufactured goods.i Although China has not yet reached the energy consumption level of the U.S, China nonetheless – due to a more polluting fuel mix – recently surpassed the U.S. in energy-related CO2 emissions.ii

Wednesday, June 2, 2010 - 11:31

China’s energy use more than quadrupled from 1980 to 2007 (see Fig. 1), and continues to grow, due in part to the demands of urbanization (i.e. construction of new buildings and infrastructure), and in part to rising production of manufactured goods.i Although China has not yet reached the energy consumption level of the U.S, China nonetheless – due to a more polluting fuel mix – recently surpassed the U.S. in energy-related CO2 emissions.ii

Wednesday, June 2, 2010 - 09:40

See original Chinese text at: http://zfs.mep.gov.cn/fg/gwyw/201005/t20100514_189497.htm

(Unofficial, Informal Translation)

Notice of the General Office of the State Council about Forwarding Guiding Opinions on Pushing Forward the Joint Prevention and Control of Atmospheric Pollution to Improve the Regional Air Quality Developed by the Ministry of Environment Protection and Relevant Departments

No. 33 [2010] of the General Office of the State Council

The people’s governments of all provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities directly under the Central Government, all ministries and commissions of the State Council, and all institutions directly under the State Council:

The Guiding Opinions on Pushing Forward the Joint Prevention and Control of Air Pollution to Improve the Regional Air Quality raised by the Ministry of Environment Protection, the National Development and Reform Commission, the Ministry of Science and Technology, the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, the Ministry of Finance, the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Construction, the Ministry of Transport, the Ministry of Commerce and the Bureau of Energy has been approved by the State Council and hereby forwarded to you for your earnest compliance and implementation.

General Office of the State Council

May 11, 2010

Monday, May 24, 2010 - 08:28

Key Points:

  • China is rolling out policies, subsidies and R&D programs aimed at encouraging the large-scale deployment of solar technologies – including a joint project with an American company to build the world’s largest solar electricity plant in the Mongolian desert.
  • China is already the world’s largest manufacturer of solar photovoltaic cells, but most are exported. Now, it is moving to expand its domestic market.
  • China’s solar push is part of a larger effort to get at least 15% of its energy from renewable sources by 2020.
Wednesday, May 19, 2010 - 15:33

Key Points:

  • China has substantially stepped up its enforcement of energy-saving building codes since 2007.
  • Current energy codes call for improving the efficiency of new structures by 50% over pre-code buildings.
  • Although rigorous, multi-step evaluations are ensuring high compliance with energy codes in major urban areas, buildings in rural areas often fail to meet the standards.
  • More stringent standards and continued enforcement of energy efficiency codes can help China curb future energy demand in residential and commercial buildings.
Wednesday, May 19, 2010 - 14:25
Key Points:
  • Historically, China’s leaders have responded to the rising demand for energy with efforts to increase supply.
  • In recent years, however, these leaders have recognized that China cannot just grow its supply of energy, but must also find ways to curb demand.
  • While China is taking significant steps to curb demand, the nations’ leadership remains wary of embracing policies to reduce demand that could be politically unpopular and slow economic growth. As a result, China faces longer-term risks of energy shortages and economic and environmental problems.
Tuesday, May 4, 2010 - 10:18

Key Points:

  • China has become one of the world’s largest and fastest-growing markets for household appliances, such as televisions, clothes washers and refrigerators.
  • To improve the energy efficiency of these products, China has developed an array of mandatory and voluntary standards and labeling programs.
  • These programs promise to significantly reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, but stepped up compliance testing and enforcement could enable China to reap even bigger gains.
  • International collaboration – including with experts from the United States – has played an important part in China’s appliance efficiency efforts.
Monday, April 12, 2010 - 17:48

In late November 2009, China announced its intention to reduce the intensity of carbon dioxide emissions within the Chinese economy by 40-45% by 2020, as compared with a 2005 baseline. China then reported this goal to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Secretariat on January 28, 2010.

This announcement, coming on the heels of the United States’ announced pledge of a 17% reduction in absolute greenhouse gas emissions between 2005 and 2020, garnered a great deal of attention within both the US and internationally, with experts weighing in with both approval and doubts about China’s ambition.i

To enhance understanding of China’s commitment, we provide answers to the major questions related to the Chinese carbon intensity target below.

Monday, April 12, 2010 - 08:04

WHAT:

Leading U.S. experts on China will brief journalists Tuesday on Beijing’s climate policies and the actions it is taking to combat climate change both domestically and internationally. A panel of four experts affiliated with the ChinaFAQs network, a project of the World Resources Institute, will discuss the prospects for progress on China’s climate goals, including carbon intensity, and for U.S. – China cooperation on climate change. The event will be moderated by Jonathan Lash, president of WRI. The briefing will be followed with light refreshments and the opportunity for journalists to meet with the panelists.

WHEN:

Tuesday, April 13, 2010 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. EST

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Friday, April 9, 2010 - 12:22

Thank you for the opportunity to contribute to the deliberations of this Commission.

My name is Rob Bradley, and I am Director of the International Climate Policy Initiative at the World Resources Institute. The World Resources Institute is a non-profit, non-partisan environmental think tank that goes beyond research to provide practical solutions to the world’s most urgent environment and development challenges.

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